LEARNER-CENTERED LITERACY

The Core Collaborative Learning Network supports educators in creating the conditions for learner-centered literacy.  The goal of the learner-centered literacy pathway is to empower students to take ownership of their learning by amplifying the power of feedback, discussion and collaboration in school, college, career and life!  Literacy is ever-changing and is backbone to all learning.

A child who reads will be an adult who thinks.

- Sasha Salmina

 

Writing is the painting of the voice.

- Voltaire

3 AREAS OF FOCUS

ELEMENTARY LITERACY

SECONDARY LITERACY

LITERACY ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES

 
ELEMENTARY LITERACY

Multi-Sensory Literacy by Design

 

When we learn every one of us uses their eyes, ears and bodies to connect to the material in unique and individualized ways. Multi-Sensory teaching employs a combination of visual (what we see), auditory (what we hear) and kinesthetic-tactile (what we feel) cues simultaneously to teach concepts. We are not just one type of learner, but rather we all use a customized multi-sensory mix of our senses to connect to what knowledge. Therefore, we need to create a balance in how we are teaching people so that all students have an equal opportunity to learn. Author: Amber Lamprecht

There are three areas of cognitive processing central to The Core Collaborative Multi-Sensory Framework in connection with auditory, visual and language skill sets.​ 

Phonemic Awareness: There needs to be development of phonemic awareness skills, which include manipulative elements in a program can aid in developing sound identification, blending and segmenting skills.

 

Sight Word Development: For sight word development, spelling and non-phonetic pattern recognition system of using the fingers rather than a pen or pencil to write on different surfaces help the brain to improve visual memory imperative for reading fluency.

 

Reading Comprehension: For improving reading comprehension, a foundation in concept imagery skills can be used by teaching students to visualize and then describe what their imagery looks like.

Repeated Interactive Read Aloud

 

Yes, our early readers can learn how to read complex texts! In an interactive Read-Aloud, the teacher scaffolds for student learning by carefully crafting the interactive Read-Aloud.  When planning for an interactive read aloud, it is important to start with the end in mind.  This session will support teachers in determining standards-based lenses for repeated reads.  Teachers will move through the scaffolding with best strategies for implementation and learn how to continually assess students using a checklist.  Ultimately, teams can use this information with students and each other to ensure feedback is responsive to students’ needs. Author: Isaac Wells

Learning Intentions:

  • Defining the Repeated Interactive Read Aloud

  • Understanding the key factors of a repeated interactive Read-Aloud (think aloud, think with, turn and talk, stop and jot)

  • Leveraging text sets for purposeful planning

  • Experience the process of an Interactive Read Aloud

  • Reflect, debrief and plan for implementation

Guiding Readers Three-Part Series: Getting Started, Impact, and Independence 

Reading is a complex activity, one that requires a balanced program that includes reading to, with, and by children.  Guiding is the reading “with” children part that is designed to meet the diverse needs of all students.  This session supports teachers to create the conditions that draw on competencies outlined in the developmental and standards-based progressions.  These conditions allow for students to take ownership of their learning because they have clear, specific criteria for success, receive descriptive feedback and have multiple opportunities to practice. Author: Isaac Wells

Part 1: Launching Guiding Readers

  • Describe success criteria for guided reading for teachers and students

  • Create a lesson plan for guided readers

  • Learn and apply three teacher moves to provide feedback

  • Learn how to analyze evidence of student thinking

Part 2: Guiding Readers for Impact

  • Learn to analyze evidence of student thinking to plan instruction 

  • Understand the importance of observational notes and data for refining groups

  • Support students in self and peer assessment within guided reading sessions

  • Practice and plan for effective guided reading lessons

Part 3: Guiding Readers for Independence

  • Create student friendly mini progressions for goal setting and instruction

  • Understand and apply the four levels of feedback with students

  • Learn to engage students in personal goal setting conversations

  • Plan for creating conditions for independent and partner practice

Igniting Goal Setting in a Reader's Workshop

If you have twenty-five students read the same text, there will be twenty-five different experiences and reactions.  Traditionally, reading has been taught as if this were not true.  Reading is a uniquely personal act and our young readers learn best when reading is personalized.  This session will focus on how to create learning conditions to help students understand how reading instruction is connected to their own reading.  When we instill habits of mind, students will learn what it takes to be a great reader in the early years and beyond! Author: Isaac Wells

Learning Intentions:

  • Learn the foundations of a reading workshop

  • Understand personalized reading and the importance of learning progressions

  • How to create conditions for student reading connections

  • Develop articulate learners to achieve their reading goals

  • Instill habits of mind to support continual reading growth

 
SECONDARY LITERACY

Balancing Secondary Literacy Foundation

 

This foundational day will explore what it means to be literate today and how the demands differ dramatically from earlier generations.  This session will address the “learning gap” that often occurs between elementary and secondary levels in reading and writing.  We will explore what students are reading now and how to address text complexity.  We will also address writing as a process and how to motivate students to revise their writing.  The session will end with reflection and action planning for implementation.

Learning Intentions:

  • Define “literacy” and what it means in our society today

  • Understand the “learning gap” that occurs what we can do about it

  • Explore what students are reading (genres) and text complexity levels

  • Explore what types of writing students are doing and writing as a process

  • Reflect for Implementation Planning

Reading Closely and Actively in Secondary

 

Students come to class knowing how to read, but often struggle reading complex texts in literature and nonfiction. Do students often say, “I don’t understand this!” or “I don’t like to read?”  Are teachers summarizing for students too much to “keep up the pace?”  This session will focus on the deep understanding of complex texts through close reading and how to create the conditions for student learning in the English Language Art’s Classroom.  We recommend two sessions to ensure classroom modeling and reflection. Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Intentions:

  • Define “text complexity” and discuss why students struggle

  • Learn and apply close reading as a strategy for deep understanding

  • Leverage standards-based lenses for reading closely 

  • Explore the power of text-sets  

  • Create a close read within ELA for immediate use 

Igniting Writing in the Secondary Classroom 

Do your students share that they do not like to write?  Do your students struggle with what to do during the revision process?  Are teachers struggling with how to help their students stay engaged with the writing process?   This session will focus on the writing process and how to support students for a variety of writing products.  It will support teachers to create the conditions for students to show their learning through writing and how to help students take more ownership. We recommend two sessions to ensure time for classroom modeling and reflection. Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Intentions

  • Define writing as a process vs a product and how to balance the two

  • Learn and apply criteria for revision writing 

  • Create a writing prompt and criteria for immediate use and revision focus

Journalism by Design

In today’s world, being a consumer of truth is essential. Students need to learn how to discern what to trust and where to dig deeper. In this workshop, participants will explore state standards and how journalism naturally helps students read, write and think critically while maintaining an interdisciplinary focus. Author: Starr Sackstein

Learning Intentions:

  • Unpack state standards and align them with tenets of journalism

  • Develop assignments & lesson plans that use literacy skills to develop critical readers 

  • Launch framework for rubrics and co-construction of success criteria with students

  • Explore using current events as a means to read, write speak & listen in all content classes

  • Dig deeply in current media trends to help students become excellent consumers of news

Journalism: The Truly Interdisciplinary Experience

If your school is looking to develop a truly interdisciplinary learning experience for students, then journalism in your content. Students will be able to learn about current events across content areas, research, read and write for an authentic audience. Bringing a foundational journalism class to your district provides an opportunity to know how to seek and share truth while connecting classroom learning. We recommend multiple sessions to support job-embedded coaching. Author: Starr Sackstein

Learning Intentions:

  • Define and explore journalism as an interdisciplinary content

  • Dig deeply into the necessary skills to be a critical journalist in today’s environment 

  • Writing purposefully for an audience

  • Focus on news writing, editorial, feature and/or investigative feature, photojournalism

  • Create multimedia presentations aligning with current trends

  • Leverage social media for academic learning: blogging, live tweeting, etc.

Building a Sustainable Student Media Outlet

If you want to create the most naturally student-centered learning environment than building a news program is the best way to do that. In a media classroom, not only do students learn how to read, write and think critically every day, but they take ownership of their audience. Having an authentic audience while getting the necessary research, writing, technology and social media skills during the school day, helps to prepare students for their futures. Teachers will learn how to start, manage and revise a sustainable media outlet with the help of a coach who has done just that. We recommend multiple sessions to ensure job-embedded coaching.  Author: Starr Sackstein

Learning Intentions:

  • Explore the role of the educator and students in the student media outlet 

  • Build a structure for self-sustainability

  • Know the first amendment and how it pertains to a student press

  • Develop a curriculum for student journalists with an authentic audience in mind

  • Empower student leaders to learn to make responsible decisions

  • Explore the skills needed and standards alignment to develop excellent student reporter

 
LITERACY ACROSS THE DISCIPLINES

Literacy Across the Disciplines: Foundation Day

 

Teachers of all disciplines are teachers of literacy.  Students need to experience meaningful reading, writing and collaborative discussions in other content areas to grow as literacy learners. Cross-curricular literacy instruction is key for students to make interdisciplinary connections and to become career and college ready.  

Do your students struggle with reading complex texts in your content area?  Do your students ask “why do we have to write” in your classroom?  Are your students often off topic or not deeply engaged while in collaborative settings?  Are teachers struggling to move through their content and not sure how to address reading, writing, and discussion groups in their classes?  

This foundational day will address why students struggle with literacy in the content areas and what teachers can do to support the conditions for literacy learning within their content. Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Intentions:

  • Define “literacy” and what it means in our society today

  • Understand the need for cross-curricular literacy as key to learning content

  • Explore what students are reading and writing in one’s content area (baseline)

  • Explore what types of collaborative conversations students are having (baseline)

  • Reflect for Implementation Planning

Reading Across the Disciplines

 

Students come to class knowing how to read, but often struggle reading complex texts found in the disciplines.  Do students often say, “I don’t understand this!” when reading a primary document or an informational text?  Are teachers summarizing for students too much to “keep up the pace?”  This session will focus on the deep understanding of complex texts through close reading and how to create the conditions for student learning within one’s own discipline.  Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Intentions:

  • Define “text complexity” and what it means in one’s own discipline

  • Learn and apply close reading as a strategy for deep understanding 

  • Create a close read within one’s own discipline for immediate use

Reading Across the Disciplines II

 

A follow up session to Reading Across the Disciplines.  This session will provide time to reflect and debrief on the use of close reading created in the previous session and implemented in the classroom.  Teachers will create another close read using a different text, form, or genre.  Emphasis in this session will be on textual connections. Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Outcomes:

  • Reflect on one’s own learning and application of close reading 

  • Create close read within one’s own discipline for immediate use 

  • Learn to support students to make text-to-text connections

Writing Across the Disciplines

 

Do your students ask why do have write in your class because it isn’t an English class?  Do your students struggle to understand that writing is a way of learning the content at a deeper level?  Are teachers struggling with how to help their students with types of writing needed in their discipline?   This session will focus on writing as a way to learn content deeply and for students to think critically.  It will support teachers to create the conditions for students to show their learning through writing. Author: Lisa Cebelak

Learning Outcomes:

  • Define types of writing within one’s own discipline

  • Learn and apply writing prompts and criteria that support critical thinking

  • Create a writing prompt and criteria within one’s own discipline for immediate use

Writing Across the Disciplines II

 

A follow up session to Writing Across the Disciplines.  This session will provide time to reflect and debrief on the writing prompt and criteria created in the previous session and implemented in the classroom.  Teachers will create another writing prompt with criteria using a different writing text type.  Emphasis in this session will be on textual connections. Author: Lisa Cebelak

 

Learning Outcomes:

  • Reflect on one’s own learning and application of writing within one’s content

  • Create a writing prompt and criteria within one’s own discipline for immediate use

  • Learn to support students to make text-to-text connections in their writing

 
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© 2014-2019

The Core Collaborative

Tel: 619-432-CORE (2673)